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{documentary} think like a photographer, part two: the moment

this is part two

of a seven part series. You can find links below to earlier and later posts.

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I started a conversation recently, with several photographer friends – women with amazing talent and successful businesses across the world. I posed the question, “How do you think like a photographer?”  And I’m sharing what I gleaned in the next few posts, because I think these ways of thinking can begin to transform your photos right away.

2.  Wait on “the moment”. Get past the urge to fire off 25 shots a minute in hopes that one of them is good. It just won’t be. Because a photographer isn’t thinking about getting as many shots as possible: she’s thinking about the moment before her, and waiting for the Important Thing that’s happening – when the reality in front of you yields that moment, reveals that truth about what’s going on here, the photographer knows and that’s when she shoots. Her eyes get dry from not-blinking as she holds the camera between her brain and her subject. She is waiting for the moment. Iconic photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson said, “Photography is not like painting. There is a creative fraction of a second when you are taking a picture. Your eye must see a composition or an expression that life itself offers you, and you must know with intuition when to click the camera. That is the moment the photographer is creative… Oop! The Moment! Once you miss it, it is gone forever.”

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(c) Red Turtle Photography | Washington DC maternity leave photographer

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Part Three will be posted tomorrow, so be sure to come back!

Click here to return to part one: become obsessed with light

If you’re feeling ready to jump into your photography more seriously, consider taking my upcoming workshop, Camera Boss. Click here to learn more!

 

xo, Katie

 

 

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